As seen at @cornell_university’s botanical garden! An amazing #fall shot of #cornellplantations by Jay Potter! #ithaca

As seen at @cornell_university’s botanical garden! An amazing #fall shot of #cornellplantations by Jay Potter! #ithaca

Early fall in the F. R. Newman Arboretum!  Photos by: Jay Potter

Stunning!!!!!

The Cascadilla Gorge Trail is re-open!

Last week Cornell Plantations, along with it’s partners at Cornell University, and with representatives from the city of Ithaca re-opened the Cascadilla Gorge Trail.

The trail was closed for 6-years while we completed a $2.75 Million restoration project.  There will be two guided hikes led by Todd Bittner, Director of natural areas at Cornell Plantations.  The first is Friday, September 26 beginning at 3pm.  The second is Friday, October 3 beginning at noon.  The hikes are free, but pre-registration is required: http://bit.ly/ZHrmz0

In the next few posts, we will be telling you the story of the gorge trail, and today, we begin at the beginning…

Historic Cascadilla

The gorge has changed slowly but steadily over time. The gorge continues to widen and deepen, at about 1/8” per year. These changes don’t come evenly though, as centuries may pass before large blocks of the gorge collapse. A more recent change has been the loss of native biodiversity, with many native wildflowers, shrubs and trees being replaced by an invasive, non-native flora.

Construction of the trail system began in 1929 and was completed in 1931. The work was enabled by a $175,000 (approximately $2,400,000 in 2014 dollars) gift from Colonel Henry W. Sackett (class of 1875 and Cornell Board of Trustee member) for development of trails in both Cascadilla and Fall Creek Gorges. The map is notable for what it proposed as well as what is no longer present. The Dewitt Place covered bridge and a 40’ tall dam just upstream as well as multiple gorge trail entrances and staircases have long since been abandoned or removed.

Stone Foot Bridge

The Sackett funded trail project constructed this iconic stone arch footbridge. The bridge today appears nearly identical to the one built in 1930, though the surrounding forest has changed significantly.

College Avenue Bridge

This circa 1930’s photo of the College Avenue Bridge shows portions of the trail below, which have been changed repeatedly over the intervening 85 years.

Treman Triangle

The planning for the parkland known today as Treman Triangle, was one of the more contentious projects funded by the Col. Henry Sackett gift. Papers Livingston Farrand archived at Kroch Library documented a significant difference of opinion about the parks future design between the benefactor, Sackett, and Cornell Architecture Professor, Gorton Davis.  The photo shows the park following its construction, circa 1930.

cornelluniversity:

Empire State Building lit BIG RED and white to kick off #Cornell150 celebration. Stand up and be counted as a proud Cornellian. Show your Sesquicentennial spirit! 

What a great weekend for Cornell!  It began with a NASDAQ take over in Time Square, then this, and this morning the Big Red Band took over the Today Show Plaza!  As Cornell Plantations celebrates is 70th year, we wish you a happy 150th birthday!

cornelluniversity:

Empire State Building lit BIG RED and white to kick off #Cornell150 celebration. Stand up and be counted as a proud Cornellian. Show your Sesquicentennial spirit! 

What a great weekend for Cornell!  It began with a NASDAQ take over in Time Square, then this, and this morning the Big Red Band took over the Today Show Plaza!  As Cornell Plantations celebrates is 70th year, we wish you a happy 150th birthday!

Join Wynnie Stein, for Plantations next Garden to Table program on 9/14) as she shares some of the best loved recipes from the famed Moosewood Restaurant located in Ithaca, NY.  There are only 10 spots left - so sign up today: http://bit.ly/1qJgHg1
To peek your curiosity here is a recipe for the Moosewood’s famed Lime Pecan Bars:
These bars are a very popular treat at Moosewood. They have a chewy cookie crust topped with a sweet lime custard. Only freshly squeezed lime juice will provide zing without bitterness. If you can’t resist the flavor of limes, you will definitely want to use the optional lime peel, although these bars are excellent without it.
Get the full recipe here: http://bit.ly/1rWgwls

Join Wynnie Stein, for Plantations next Garden to Table program on 9/14) as she shares some of the best loved recipes from the famed Moosewood Restaurant located in Ithaca, NY.  There are only 10 spots left - so sign up today: http://bit.ly/1qJgHg1

To peek your curiosity here is a recipe for the Moosewood’s famed Lime Pecan Bars:

These bars are a very popular treat at Moosewood. They have a chewy cookie crust topped with a sweet lime custard. Only freshly squeezed lime juice will provide zing without bitterness. If you can’t resist the flavor of limes, you will definitely want to use the optional lime peel, although these bars are excellent without it.

Get the full recipe here: http://bit.ly/1rWgwls


Celebrate the reopening of the Cascadilla Gorge Trail
Monday, September 15, 2014 4:30 - 5:00 p.m. Treman Triangle Park at the base of the trail off of Linn Street

Remarks by
Christopher Dunn, E. N. Wilds director of Cornell PlantationsKyuJung Whang, vice president of facilities services, Cornell UniversityCarolyn Peterson, former Mayor of the City of IthacaMayor Svante Myrick, Mayor of the City of IthacaTodd Bittner, director of Natural Areas for Cornell Plantations
Everyone is invited to do a self-guided tour of the gorge after the ceremony.
Celebrate the reopening of the Cascadilla Gorge Trail
Monday, September 15, 2014
4:30 - 5:00 p.m.


Treman Triangle Park at the base of the trail off of Linn Street
Remarks by
Christopher Dunn, E. N. Wilds director of Cornell Plantations
KyuJung Whang, vice president of facilities services, Cornell University
Carolyn Peterson, former Mayor of the City of Ithaca
Mayor Svante Myrick, Mayor of the City of Ithaca
Todd Bittner, director of Natural Areas for Cornell Plantations

Everyone is invited to do a self-guided tour of the gorge after the ceremony.

cornellcals:

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Joanie Mackowski believes poetry is a living thing, an organism that evolves with humans just as orchid moths evolve alongside the flowers they pollinate. According to Mackowski, poetry shares another similarity with living organisms: It’s a form threatened with extinction. She notes that…

"Victis" has arrived at Cornell Plantations!  You may have seen this amazing piece of arbortecture when it was on display at the Johnson Museum of Art at Cornell University, if you missed it, you can get a chance to see it in front of the Nevin Welcome Center located in the heart of the Botanical Garden.

"Victis acernis" is latin for "vanquished maple". it is one of a series of pieces referencing the harmful effects of global warming. These pieces are positioned to resemble the checkmated king in chess. In this case, warmer winters are leading to less sap production and increased tree mortality.

"Victis" was created by artist and Cornell University Professor Jack Elliot and students from the university.

This sugar maple was harvested by Cornell University, Jack Elliot (professor in design and environmental analysis program at Cornell) and his students cut and painstakingly cleaned the trunk of its bark and soil.  This process took 2 years.  It is meant to reference the effects of global warming on trees - a warming climate for these trees mean less sap production and increased mortality.

This body of work is entitled “arbortecture.” These pieces are derived from large tree parts that have been harvested by Cornell University. These examples range in scale from small to large, from handheld to crane lifted. They are intended to challenge ideas about the human/nature relationship through juxtapositions of the geometric and the organic; the intentional and the spontaneous; the light and the dark. they often refer to a specific environmental issue, such as climate change or the decline of nature appreciation, but their primary purpose is to move the viewer though their scale, power, and intricacy.

—(Taken from Jack Elliot’s website.)

Earlier this spring we installed a Climate Change Garden to help visitors understand the impact climate change has on plants. Through a partnership with faculty in the Horticulture and Landscape Architecture departments and funding from the Toward Sustainability Foundation, an unheated greenhouse known as a high tunnel and a series of raised beds were installed inside and outside the high tunnel. The high tunnel creates a warmer environment enabling visitors to compare the growth of the same plants growing inside and outside. The aim of this project is to provide a place for people to see for themselves how plants are affected by differences in growing conditions, primarily temperature, and start to think about how they can adapt their gardens so they continue to thrive.

Intern Emily Rodekohr ‘15 tended to the garden and collected data throughout the summer. Find out what she learned!

Booze & Botany

Join Amy Stewart in the Herb Garden on September 17 from 4:30-6:30 for a pre-lecture coctail party featuring drinks from her book, “The Drunken Botanist: The Plants that Create the World’s Great Drinks.”  Light hors d’oeuvres by Agava will also be served.  Participants must be 21 or older and prepared to show proof of age.  Pre-registration is required.  Fee: $50 ($45 for Plantations members & volunteers, and Cornell stduents).  Click here to REGISTER TODAY!